#Techfest International Student #Conference at IIT Bombay #IJSRD

conferenceTechfest International Student Conference is an initiative to bring together the student community and professors with a common research background. TISC marks a step further in our endeavor to promote science and technology among the students by facilitating the exchange of knowledge between academia and industry.

Featured imageTechfest International Student Conference presents a unique opportunity for students to present their work in front of fellow students, senior professors from top universities, industrialists and policy-makers. It aims at giving recognition to students for their research at a relatively young age. An enriching experience to research oriented minds, TISC will give young scientists an insight into the topic, learn new ideas and build networks beneficial for the future.

The theme for the conference is Renewable Energy Systems, potentially the most important aspect of human life in forthcoming decades. TISC is being hosted by IIT Bombay, one of the premier institutes of science and technology in India known for its path-breaking research and quality education.

#IJSRD | Wireless Phone Charger: the uniqueness and the features

Wowhoo Wireless Phone Charger: the uniqueness and the features
blog#IJSRD | Research Lets Do it… #call for paper

Major wireless phone carriers have all been adapting the Qi wireless technology. Additionally many car manufactures are adding them to their 2014-2015 models. Manufactures include but are not limited to the following: Jeep, Toyota, Prius Harrier, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Volkswagen, Audi aswell as Porsche.

Due to the new and improved design and usability our initial launch date has been revised from Jan 7th to March 1st. we added approximately 8mm to our diameter to allow a better internal design.  The small revision to the Wowhoo charger allow us to get that quicker charge which is most important. The 10% is a big jump in charging speed.

for more details click here

Fusion Reactor Concept Could Be Cheaper Than Coal

University of Washington
Summary:
Engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.
blog
Research . .  ? ?  Lets Do IT… #IJSRD

Fusion energy almost sounds too good to be true — zero greenhouse gas emissions, no long-lived radioactive waste, a nearly unlimited fuel supply.

Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas.

IJSRD is a leading e-journal, under which we are encouraging and exploring newer ideas of current trends in Engineering and Science by publishing papers containing pure knowledge.

University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

The team published its reactor design and cost-analysis findings last spring and will present results Oct. 17 at the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Fusion Energy Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia.

“Right now, this design has the greatest potential of producing economical fusion power of any current concept,” said Thomas Jarboe, a UW professor of aeronautics and astronautics and an adjunct professor in physics.

The UW’s reactor, called the dynomak, started as a class project taught by Jarboe two years ago. After the class ended, Jarboe and doctoral student Derek Sutherland — who previously worked on a reactor design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — continued to develop and refine the concept.

The design builds on existing technology and creates a magnetic field within a closed space to hold plasma in place long enough for fusion to occur, allowing the hot plasma to react and burn. The reactor itself would be largely self-sustaining, meaning it would continuously heat the plasma to maintain thermonuclear conditions. Heat generated from the reactor would heat up a coolant that is used to spin a turbine and generate electricity, similar to how a typical power reactor works.

“This is a much more elegant solution because the medium in which you generate fusion is the medium in which you’re also driving all the current required to confine it,” Sutherland said.

There are several ways to create a magnetic field, which is crucial to keeping a fusion reactor going. The UW’s design is known as a spheromak, meaning it generates the majority of magnetic fields by driving electrical currents into the plasma itself. This reduces the amount of required materials and actually allows researchers to shrink the overall size of the reactor.

Other designs, such as the experimental fusion reactor project that’s currently being built in France — called Iter — have to be much larger than the UW’s because they rely on superconducting coils that circle around the outside of the device to provide a similar magnetic field. When compared with the fusion reactor concept in France, the UW’s is much less expensive — roughly one-tenth the cost of Iter — while producing five times the amount of energy.

The UW researchers factored the cost of building a fusion reactor power plant using their design and compared that with building a coal power plant. They used a metric called “overnight capital costs,” which includes all costs, particularly startup infrastructure fees. A fusion power plant producing 1 gigawatt (1 billion watts) of power would cost $2.7 billion, while a coal plant of the same output would cost $2.8 billion, according to their analysis.

“If we do invest in this type of fusion, we could be rewarded because the commercial reactor unit already looks economical,” Sutherland said. “It’s very exciting.”

Right now, the UW’s concept is about one-tenth the size and power output of a final product, which is still years away. The researchers have successfully tested the prototype’s ability to sustain a plasma efficiently, and as they further develop and expand the size of the device they can ramp up to higher-temperature plasma and get significant fusion power output.

The team has filed patents on the reactor concept with the UW’s Center for Commercialization and plans to continue developing and scaling up its prototypes.

Other members of the UW design team include Kyle Morgan of physics; Eric Lavine, Michal Hughes, George Marklin, Chris Hansen, Brian Victor, Michael Pfaff, and Aaron Hossack of aeronautics and astronautics; Brian Nelson of electrical engineering; and, Yu Kamikawa and Phillip Andrist formerly of the UW.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

For more detail click here.

Fusion Reactor Concept Could Be Cheaper Than Coal

University of Washington
Summary:
Engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.
blog
Research . .  ? ?  Lets Do IT… #IJSRD

Fusion energy almost sounds too good to be true — zero greenhouse gas emissions, no long-lived radioactive waste, a nearly unlimited fuel supply.

Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas.

IJSRD is a leading e-journal, under which we are encouraging and exploring newer ideas of current trends in Engineering and Science by publishing papers containing pure knowledge.

University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

The team published its reactor design and cost-analysis findings last spring and will present results Oct. 17 at the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Fusion Energy Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia.

“Right now, this design has the greatest potential of producing economical fusion power of any current concept,” said Thomas Jarboe, a UW professor of aeronautics and astronautics and an adjunct professor in physics.

The UW’s reactor, called the dynomak, started as a class project taught by Jarboe two years ago. After the class ended, Jarboe and doctoral student Derek Sutherland — who previously worked on a reactor design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — continued to develop and refine the concept.

The design builds on existing technology and creates a magnetic field within a closed space to hold plasma in place long enough for fusion to occur, allowing the hot plasma to react and burn. The reactor itself would be largely self-sustaining, meaning it would continuously heat the plasma to maintain thermonuclear conditions. Heat generated from the reactor would heat up a coolant that is used to spin a turbine and generate electricity, similar to how a typical power reactor works.

“This is a much more elegant solution because the medium in which you generate fusion is the medium in which you’re also driving all the current required to confine it,” Sutherland said.

There are several ways to create a magnetic field, which is crucial to keeping a fusion reactor going. The UW’s design is known as a spheromak, meaning it generates the majority of magnetic fields by driving electrical currents into the plasma itself. This reduces the amount of required materials and actually allows researchers to shrink the overall size of the reactor.

Other designs, such as the experimental fusion reactor project that’s currently being built in France — called Iter — have to be much larger than the UW’s because they rely on superconducting coils that circle around the outside of the device to provide a similar magnetic field. When compared with the fusion reactor concept in France, the UW’s is much less expensive — roughly one-tenth the cost of Iter — while producing five times the amount of energy.

The UW researchers factored the cost of building a fusion reactor power plant using their design and compared that with building a coal power plant. They used a metric called “overnight capital costs,” which includes all costs, particularly startup infrastructure fees. A fusion power plant producing 1 gigawatt (1 billion watts) of power would cost $2.7 billion, while a coal plant of the same output would cost $2.8 billion, according to their analysis.

“If we do invest in this type of fusion, we could be rewarded because the commercial reactor unit already looks economical,” Sutherland said. “It’s very exciting.”

Right now, the UW’s concept is about one-tenth the size and power output of a final product, which is still years away. The researchers have successfully tested the prototype’s ability to sustain a plasma efficiently, and as they further develop and expand the size of the device they can ramp up to higher-temperature plasma and get significant fusion power output.

The team has filed patents on the reactor concept with the UW’s Center for Commercialization and plans to continue developing and scaling up its prototypes.

Other members of the UW design team include Kyle Morgan of physics; Eric Lavine, Michal Hughes, George Marklin, Chris Hansen, Brian Victor, Michael Pfaff, and Aaron Hossack of aeronautics and astronautics; Brian Nelson of electrical engineering; and, Yu Kamikawa and Phillip Andrist formerly of the UW.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

For more detail click here.

Carbon Nanotube ‘Shock Absorbers’ Excel At Dampening Vibration – #IJSRD

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Summary:
Research on a new class of nanostructured materials used to reduce vibrations in mechanical equipment and electronic devices, being developed by a team of scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will be featured in Nature Materials.
blogResearch Lets DO IT…. #IJSRD

Research on a new class of nanostructured materials used to reduce vibrations in mechanical equipment and electronic devices, being developed by a team of scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will be featured in Nature Materials.

“The nanoscale building blocks we have developed have both micro and macro applications,” said Nikhil Koratkar, assistant professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering at Rensselaer. “The new systems reduce and control vibrations within structures and will benefit the performance, safety, and reliability of future manufacturing equipment, sensitive laboratory equipment, and everyday electronic devices.”

The Rensselaer research team, led by Koratkar, added carbon nanotube fillers to traditional vibration reduction materials to enhance their energy dissipation capability. Adding large quantities of nanoscale fillers increases the amount of surface area, and thereby increases frictional sliding that occurs at the filler-to-filler interface. The result is a decrease in vibrations.

In 2004, Koratkar received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER) to fund the development of these new materials. Additional Rensselaer researchers on the project include Pulickel Ajayan, professor of materials science and engineering; Pawel Keblinksi, associate professor of materials science and engineering; and Jonghwan Suhr, a doctoral student in mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering.

The research is available in the Nature Materials journal online, and will be published in an upcoming print edition of the journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

For more information click here

Research on CLOUD DATA

Cloud Data Loss:
A data breach is the result of a malicious and probably intrusive action. Data loss may occur when a disk drive dies without its owner having created a backup. It occurs when the owner of encrypted data loses the key that unlocks it. Small amounts of data were lost for some Amazon Web Service customers as its EC2 cloud suffered “a remirroring storm” due to human operator error on Easter weekend in 2011. And a data loss could occur intentionally in the event of a malicious attack.

The alliance cited the case of Mat Honan, a writer for Wired magazine, who in the summer of 2012 found an intruder had broken into his Gmail, Twitter, and Apple accounts and deleted all the baby pictures of his 18-month old daughter.

Research Lets Do It.... #IJSRD

“For both consumers and businesses, the prospect of permanently losing one’s data is terrifying,” the report acknowledged. There are many techniques to prevent data loss. They occur anyway.

to read article click here

For more information click here

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